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A Game to Teach Entreprenuership

Startup Heroes sounds like a game that can give more people the opportunity to explore the world of entrepreneurship in a risk free way. I hope many people will play this game and that many entrepreneurs will be born!

Classroom Aid

Dear Readers,

I am the co-founder and CEO of the Startup Heroes, an online entrepreneurship educational game simulating the process of the startup creation in an engaging, interactive and risk-free real-life 3D environment. We are living an amazing journey!

Most of the students today perceive entrepreneurship as too risky, too costly, too scary and… simply unknown! It is a real black box, and Startup Heroes is a great tool leveraging modern education methods to uncover it and even inspire to become entrepreneurs! According to our recent surveys, more than 70% of our players get a significant increase in their interest and likelihood of creating their own businesses after playing the game!

Did you know you remember up to 9 times better what you experience in a simulation compared to a classic lecture at school? In Startup Heroes, you embark in the journey of a young student passionate for building electronic gadgets. Along your way to develop your entrepreneurial…

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Educational Games in Denmark

Jan Gejel's picturehttps://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/graphics/flags/large/da-lgflag.gif

Jan Gejel describes some of the opportunities and challenges for educational games in an article entitled “You Got Game! Learning Games and Games in Learning” for the International Conference The Future of Education.  Gejel is the European project manager at Aarhus Social and Healthcare College in Denmark.   This article explores important questions related to the future of games in education, particularly; why there are not more of these games, how will these games be paid for, and how might young developers and educational institutions work together.  This article is helpful for understanding the serious gaming context in Europe, in general, and Scandinavia, in particular.
Here are some highlights (to read the full article following the link at the end).

“In Europe the interest in learning games emerged in the beginning of the last decade. Again, the interest in games was a result of the increasing interest in technology in education: internet, software, e-learning, etc. Nevertheless, the explosion of the video games market did not at all result in the creation of games for education, of learning games. Still in 2012 very few quality learning games have been developed in Europe and the worlds of video games and education are still not in any kind of dialogue – apart from very few exceptions.”

“The video game market of entertainment games has grown at an incredible speed throughout the last decades, now worth the double of the film industry.”

“. . . now researchers and game developers are discussing what learning potentials are included in the very activity of gaming itself, and thus in the very design of video games, serious or commercial.  It is being debated that the very design of computer games, no matter the content, represents a very powerful learning process, due to the basic design elements in video games.
The focus is thus shifted from the entertaining form of video games to the learning potentials of the gaming itself. This shift caused a tremendous upswing in the interest in learning games and for the first time in Europe educational players joined the discussions and they showed a serious interest in games for education.”

“Dramatic different business models must be developed, if education should exploit the learning potentials of gaming.
Real encounters between the game world and the educational world must be organized, on an ongoing basis, through which (young) game developers and teachers and institutions can meet and develop mutual platforms of collaboration.”

To read the full article, by Jan Gejel, click Here.