Blog Archives

6 Game Resources for learning STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)

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Monique Liles recommends the following Games for learning STEM (Science Technology Engineering Math), in an article for E School news;

1. Glass Labs:

2. Cell Craft:

3. Pandemic II

4. ChemGame Tutor:

5. Ayiti The Cost of a Life:

6. Ellen J. McHenry’s website:

Liles writes “In my classroom, we play a lot of games, frequently as the lesson. We then discuss what the students experienced in the game and make content connections via whole-group discussion. I often create a graphic organizer or worksheet for students to use to organize their thoughts about the game. When I have my biology and life science students play Cell Craft, for example, I demonstrate gameplay and features for the whole class using my laptop and projector. Students complete the organizer while we go through the game as a group and discuss the content. Then, students get a chance to play the game and really immerse themselves.”

Monique Liles is a teacher at Babb Middle School in Forest Park, GA. She is a member of Discovery Education’s Discovery Educator Network (DEN), a global community of educators that are passionate about transforming the learning experience with digital media.

To read the full article at E School click here;

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/02/17/gaming-stem-813/?

EdGamer interviews Dr. Seann Dikkers

 From the EdGamer Show notes –
EdGamer Show‎ > ‎

EdGamer 122: TeacherCraft with Seann Dikkers

This week on EdGamer 122, we meet up with Dr. Seann Dikkers is an assistant professor in the Educational Technology division of the Patton College of Education at Ohio University. Formerly Dr. Dikkers served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and education consultant. Now he researches, writes, and shares the usefulness of digital media for teaching and learning as the founder and director of Gaming Matter. His books, Real-Time Research,Mobile Media Learning, and the forthcoming TeacherCraft: Using Minecraft in the Classroom are helping teachers integrate innovative technology into classroom learning.  This is another can’t miss episode of EdGamer. Tune-in and level-up!

Gaming Matter

5 Myths About Our Schools That Fall Apart When You Look Closer

Small World 2 on Steam for PC

 

Show Host: Zack Gilbert

Show Guest: Seann Dikkers  

To find the archive of EdGammer click here;

http://edreach.us/channel/edgamer/

 

Scotsman Games: Education and Games – Minecraft

Edinburgh Castle, as recreated in Minecraft. Picture: Contributed

Edinburgh Castle, as recreated in Minecraft. Picture: Contributed

MARTYN McLAUGHLIN writes that;

“IN the second of a three-part series looking at how Scotland’s gaming sector intersects with education, Martyn McLaughlin speaks to the team behind the Xbox 360 version of Minecraft to discover how the hit sandbox construction title is helping children learn complex skills.

NEARLY four and a half years have passed since Minecraft was unleashed on an unsuspected games industry. In that time, it has come to occupy an influential plinth in our cultural landscape. Devised by Sweden’s Mojang studio, it deposits players at the centre of a randomly generated cuboid domain abundant with raw materials. Creativity is essential to progress; the fundamentals of existence such as shelter are the first priorities, but in time, the game allows those who master its techniques and tools to raise wonderfully intricate structures and entire cities from the ground.

Part 1 of our Education and Games series

Since its official release in November 2011, the title has shifted upwards of 33 million copies, a sales figure in excess of seminal albums such as Sergeant Peppers’ Lonely Hearts Club Band, Hotel California and Born in the USA. In an industry too often obsessed with graphical prowess and the awkward aping of cinematic techniques, its constantly evolving universe has captured the imagination of not only gamers, but an increasing number of educationalists who see the merits of applying its mesmerising form of digital Lego to learning environments.

Around the world, Minecraft is slowly becoming accepted as a legitimate classroom tool waiting to be exploited in the same way as established media like films, books and television. In Stockholm, the home of Mojang, the Victor Rydberg school has declared it compulsory for 13-year-olds, with pupils using it to learn about city planning and environmental issues. In New York, Joel Levin, a computer teacher at a private school, helps run MinecraftEdu, an international resource geared towards promoting the game’s use in classrooms.

‘Exciting and engaging’

One of the earliest advocates for the game’s educational values, he first realised its potential after introducing it in favour of a Google Earth geography project in January 2011. “In my eight years of teaching I have never seen students so excited and engaged,” he recalled. “They run up to me in the halls to tell me what they plan to do [in the] next class. They draw pictures about the game in art. They sit at the lunch tables and strategize their next building projects. And not only the boys, but girls too.”

To read the full article by MARTYN McLAUGHLIN click here;

http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/scotsman-games-education-and-games-minecraft-1-3149663

The Serious Games Association has created a helpful list of educational games.

The Serious Games Association has developed a helpful list of educational games with detailed information about each one.  They also include an option to list new edgames. Enjoy!

“Games are changing the way children learn, helping them think differently and stimulating new ways people of all ages can use their minds. This section of the directory will list games created for use in schools and universities at home learning and vocational training.”

Here are the first three games;

CyberCIEGE
for PC
Education Level(s): 9-12, College/University Subject(s): Science
CyberCIEGE is a network security simulation packaged as a video game. It covers a broad range of cybersecurity topics. Players purchase and configure computers and network devices to keep demanding users happy (e.g., by providing Internet access) all while protecting assets from a variety of attacks.
Past/Present
for PC, MAC
Education Level(s): K-6, 9-12 Subject(s): History
Imagine a learning experience where players are thrust into the everyday hustle and bustle of life in America a century ago. That’s what happens in Past/Present, a fully realized interactive 3-D “virtual world” in which a player “becomes” a fictional character, or “avatar”, who is caught up in the big issues
Ludwig
for PC
Education Level(s): 9-12 Subject(s): Science, Physics
OVERVIEW Ludwig is a physics adventure on renewable energy for adventurers of 11 years old and up. It´s a new type of learning game, which not only conveys knowledge, but is also really fun! Ludwig was developed in cooperation with physics specialists, teachers and pupils and is based on the physics

To read their full list click here;

http://www.seriousgamesdirectory.com/proj/education/

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EdGamer discusses the top 10 video games of 2012 – (and which ones teachers can use)

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EdGamer is one of my favorite podcasts.  The host, Zack Gilbert, and show contributor, Gerry James, are teachers who play games and use games in the classroom.  They have interviewed some of the leading researchers, practitioners, and experts on educational gaming (Dr. James Paul Gee, Dr. Jeremiah McCall, Dr. Lucas Gillispie, Dr. Crystle Martin, Sylvia Martinez, Joel Levin, and Jeff Holmes).  This is a great podcast for teachers, parents, and researchers.  In the future, I plan to post and discuss their conversations here on Gaming and education.  On EdGamer #83, The guys discuss Mashable’s Top 10 Video Games of 2012 and they discus which games teachers may use – and which games they should definitely not use in the classroom.  They also give a shout out to yours truly!  Thanks guys! I love what you are doing – keep up the good work!

To listen to EdGamer #83 click here

http://edreach.us/2013/01/05/edgamer-83-can-teachers-use-the-top-10-video-games-of-2012/

A false ballance: on the pros and cons of video games

  In a recent article in the Hindustan Times (http://www.hindustantimes.com/News-Feed/BeyondBooks/Are-all-video-games-bad-for-kids/Article1-938399.aspx), the author wrote many positive things about the benefit of video games for kids;

“As the games and higher levels get more complicated, the player has to learn how to manage unforeseen obstructions and changing variables to reach the end objective.  Kids have to think fast and act even faster whether that means changing strategy, making quick analysis and reaching decisions.  It is fascinating how quickly children learn to recognize inherent patterns in games and work out the logical way of solving them.”

Unfortunately the same author went on to list some of the typical “downsides” of games as well,

“Too much game playing will make Jack a dull boy, for sure. Children who play video games endlessly are also likely to have less time for the other important tasks such as schoolwork, reading, sports etc.  There is also an obvious bad effect of addictive game playing on children’s health, including obesity, postural muscular and skeletal disorders and strained eyesight. ”

All of these “downsides” have been or are being mitigated by better games and better gaming practices.

Schoolwork:

Gaming can be part of schoolwork now that better educational games are being adopted inside and outside of the classroom.  Researchers have found that before high school, students gain little benefit from traditional homework.

Reading:

It could be argued that more kids are reading more because of video games than before.  They are not only reading more but composing more in online forums on their favorite games.

Sports:

With the advent of the Wii and other consuls with sensors, more and more games have been created that require players to exercise and have fun in the process.  Good riddance to traditional sports, where too often only the best players get any game time, while the rest of the team sits on the bench watching!
Games hold the promise of helping students to learn more, exercise more, and socialize more than ever before!