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Games Train Doctors

PMLiVE declares that;

“Interactive games are set to be the new frontier in education for healthcare professionals (HCPs) according to a leading expert in e-learning.

Speaking at the European CME Forum in London last week, Prof Peter Henning of Karlsruhe University in Germany explained that making learning “fun” could reverse a declining trend for the use of e-learning as part of continuing medical education (CME).

“Current mainstream CME e-learning courses are nice, but the number of participants is going down,” said Prof Henning, references such examples as an online eye surgery video/text course at the Virtual University of Bavaria that has just 56 participants.

He added: “Do we stick to such types of courses that have to be paid for, updated regularly and you have to be registered to participate? The answer is, of course, no.”

Instead, the use of ‘serious games’ with learning aspects should be considered as an alternative, said Prof Henning, noting that gaming has long been used as a form of education.

“Playing a game was one of the earliest strategies for learning complex patterns,” he said. “Whenever we play we are learning. So the question has to be: Why did we ever take out the fun out of learning?”

To support his point, Prof Henning provided example projects submitted to the European E-Learning Award eureleA, for which Prof Henning is head of the jury

These included the INMEDEA Simulator, which allows HCPs to example virtual patients in an online clinic, and a programme designed by Line Communications that educates doctors on the classification of bone fractures via a goal-based approach that incorporates time challenges and other gaming elements.

The hardware for gaming could also be beneficial in healthcare education, according to Prof Henning, who noted the potential of the Microsoft Kinect – a piece of kit for the Xbox console that recognises body movements.

This technology is already finding uses in healthcare, with Microsoft teaming up with Tokyo Women’s Medical University to devise a non-touch system to control a video camera during surgery.”

To read the full article from PMLiVE click here; http://www.pmlive.com/pharma_news/gaming_to_educate_doctors_520689

Mobile games up – console games down!

According to Daniel Burris, “In 2011, video game sales fell by 8 percent. And in the first 8 months of 2012, retail sales of video games have plummeted an additional 20 percent in the United States.”  But Burris adds that this may be an opportunity for gaming companies to add educational gaming divisions to make up for falling sales in the traditional entertainment market.

“…There are many great programmers — people who know how to make interactive worlds come to life — who are going to be looking for new opportunities.  It is likely that many will turn to creating game-like education and training programs for the academic and business worlds. And if the big electronic gaming companies want to grow in a slump, they should start an education-gamming division rather than lose some of their best and brightest programmers by letting them become the competition”, Burris wrote.  Let us hope that these programmers could focus their skills on developing better educational and training games.  Imagine a school lesson or a corporate training session as engaging as Halo 4!

To Read the full article go to;

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/daniel-burrus/the-gamification-of-educa_b_1980449.html