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Games Train Doctors

PMLiVE declares that;

“Interactive games are set to be the new frontier in education for healthcare professionals (HCPs) according to a leading expert in e-learning.

Speaking at the European CME Forum in London last week, Prof Peter Henning of Karlsruhe University in Germany explained that making learning “fun” could reverse a declining trend for the use of e-learning as part of continuing medical education (CME).

“Current mainstream CME e-learning courses are nice, but the number of participants is going down,” said Prof Henning, references such examples as an online eye surgery video/text course at the Virtual University of Bavaria that has just 56 participants.

He added: “Do we stick to such types of courses that have to be paid for, updated regularly and you have to be registered to participate? The answer is, of course, no.”

Instead, the use of ‘serious games’ with learning aspects should be considered as an alternative, said Prof Henning, noting that gaming has long been used as a form of education.

“Playing a game was one of the earliest strategies for learning complex patterns,” he said. “Whenever we play we are learning. So the question has to be: Why did we ever take out the fun out of learning?”

To support his point, Prof Henning provided example projects submitted to the European E-Learning Award eureleA, for which Prof Henning is head of the jury

These included the INMEDEA Simulator, which allows HCPs to example virtual patients in an online clinic, and a programme designed by Line Communications that educates doctors on the classification of bone fractures via a goal-based approach that incorporates time challenges and other gaming elements.

The hardware for gaming could also be beneficial in healthcare education, according to Prof Henning, who noted the potential of the Microsoft Kinect – a piece of kit for the Xbox console that recognises body movements.

This technology is already finding uses in healthcare, with Microsoft teaming up with Tokyo Women’s Medical University to devise a non-touch system to control a video camera during surgery.”

To read the full article from PMLiVE click here; http://www.pmlive.com/pharma_news/gaming_to_educate_doctors_520689

EdGamer Reviews the Illinois Computing Educators Conference

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EdGamer 90: Illinois Computing Educators (ICE) Conference Review

On episode 90 of EdGamer we review two of the best conferences of the year for technology and education. In the last two weeks EdGamer has attended the ICE and SIT conferences and we have a plethora of new things to share with you! Plus, you get to hear all of the wonderful antics as a result of Zack spending a few days at Gerry’s house. This you can’t miss! Tune-in and level-up!

Alternate Title- The Best Seat on the ICE

 

Show Host: Zack Gilbert

Show Contributor: Gerry James  

To listen to the Podcast click here;

http://edreach.us/2013/03/02/edgamer-90-ice-conference-review/

 

Gaming Education with the Xbox

“We learn best when we become participants in the classroom and not just the passive listener. Utilizing the Xbox (and Kinect) technology takes us an even greater distance towards a true virtual classroom. Couple this with a technology that many are already familiar with, and learning success is inevitable. As educators and instructors, we should be monitoring the evolution of the gaming devices and look for ways we can integrate it into learning. Gaming technology, perhaps, will be the bridge from online learning to virtual learning. The opportunities are limitless.”- Michael Finney
Full Text from Technorati.com Three-ways the xbox is going to change education

“The Microsoft Xbox 360 Kinect is one of most powerful consumer-oriented “Natural User Interface” devices available today. Its near-infrared camera produces 3D motion data of anything in front of the it and coupled with a standard webcam and quadraphonic microphone, the device is jammed pack with input sensors. The Microsoft Education team promotes Kinect and has prepared over a 100 lessons and activities to promote “active” learning. Microsoft also claims the Kinect may be useful as an assistive technology device and in promoting collaboration.

What you might not know is that the Kinect can plug to your computer and be used as an interface device!

Think about young students actively controlling a 3D ArcGIS Explorer Desktop globe – investigating the Earth while moving arms, legs, and torso to direct navigation, display data, or conduct an analysis. What an interesting way to engage young, energetic learners.”

Full Text – Exploring the world with arcgis explorer and the xbox 360 kinect”